How cost effective is it using an in-house “photographer”?

Anyone can take a very good photo today, whether it’s to update a headshot for a new LinkedIn profile, or capture some snaps for a company event. If you are running any kind of event for your company one of the ways planners look to contain costs or reduce the budget is to use a (usually junior) staffer to document the event rather than hire out to a professional. Depending on the size of the event and the ultimate purpose for the photos, this can certainly save costs and is worth doing, especially if your internal resource is interested in photography and really wants the added responsibility.

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But…there a few things to consider before asking your graphic artist or comms coordinator to cover an event you are hosting or a conference you’re running.

  1.  What is the opportunity cost? While at first glance it looks like a cost savings to use a resource you’ve already got on salary to do an additional job, at what cost in the use of their time and skill set does it come with? Does your content marketer (whose job it is primarily to write) or your graphic artist (whose job is to work on design, layout and production of materials for web or print) have extra time available to process the images for you? If not, what project are they taking themselves away from to manage, edit, post and deliver your images?
  2. How good are they? Notwithstanding high quality cameras on everyone’s phones, taking good, usable photos at an event requires more than just technology. Does your employee have the character, personality, vim and vigour necessary to get out there and mix it up with the attendees? Will he or she be willing to get up close for speakers and panellists, or group senior managers and executives for portraits? Interaction with guests and attendees is a critical part of getting lively, useful photos from events that will have consistent marketing value afterwards. Is your junior staffer up to the task?
  3. Do they want to do it? If they are asked to “grab some shots” while attending the event, is the request something that is viewed as an opportunity to do something fun (and show off their skills), or is it seen as yet another additional task added to their already large and growing to do list? If the latter they may not be inclined to do more than the minimum which could mean the difference between receiving 10 to 15 images (max) from an event vs 150-200 or more (depending on the length of the event) from which the person receiving the photos has to choose.

DIY photographers are a part of the industry and no professional ever got to where they are today without having started somewhere. If you have budding photographers on your team (and want to encourage their hobby which may result in them eventually leaving your employ) then there is no problem letting them loose at your next company event.

But if you are serving a specific market, and the images from your company events are part of what your clients uses to evaluate your business, think twice. All content produced today scores higher in engagement and ultimately is more effective when paired with strong visuals. Whether you sell access to events or simply want to present your company and its culture to prospective recruits, having a solid bank of quality photos to choose from for your next recruitment or ad campaign, trade show attendance, blog/Facebook/Instagram/LinkedIn post, newsletter, etc will have an impact. Nothing kills a piece of good content like a dud photo or an ineffective image.

Don’t let short-sighted thinking limit your ability to deliver on what your company needs to achieve to ostensibly save a few bucks. In the end, it may wind up costing you a lot more than you anticipated.

 

 

Taking pictures of strangers – to ask or not to ask?

South Korean girl with dog and bunny ear phone on park bench
It’s a dog’s life

Candids, or photos taken of people who are unaware they are being photographed, often result in the most interesting and emotive images a photographer can produce. These images are valued primarily for the emotions they convey and the stories they tell. However, by definition such images are an invasion of privacy and require an intimacy with the subjects that is essentially taken without consent.  But if you first ask someone if it is okay to take a photo, the essence of the moment you are observing is fundamentally altered and many photographers would argue, gone forever. What to do?

Though there are two scenarios where candid photography is essential – event photography and street photography – the challenge of whether to ask or not is one mainly faced by street photographers.

Taking candids in event photography vs street photography

In event photography, the photographer is a professional hired by their clients who often explicitly request a selection of good candids of attendees interacting with one another. Attendees are aware that they are going to be photographed – often through the placement of a sign at the entrance to the event or through explicit consent forms signed ahead of time – so the event photographer generally faces no dilemma and in fact, is encouraged to take as many strong candids as possible as these are the kinds of photos both clients, and subjects alike prefer when reviewing the final set of deliverables post-event.

Street view of main gate of Gyeongbokgung Palace

In street photography, a passtime widely enjoyed by both professionals and amateurs alike, the question of whether to ask or not to ask is more acutely relevant. With some very clear exceptions, my feeling is that the best images come from patient observation and that asking for them in advance can, and often does, ruin them. I believe if you always operate with a respect for other people and you abide by the photographer’s version of the Hippocratic oath physicians take, “to do no harm”, you are in the clear:

  • Don’t take photographs that could in any way embarrass, endanger or otherwise inflict any kind of harm on your subjects.
  • Don’t take any photographs of people in cultures where taking photographs is feared or frowned upon, for whatever reason without getting clear consent first.
  • Photographs of other people’s children is also off the list unless the parents or guardians expressly allow it – and then I make a point of sharing those images with them
  • No paparazzi photos of any kind

There is something inherently opportunistic with taking photos surreptitiously. The very word “snap-shot” implies a quick, reflexive response to something noticed that will quickly disappear. That precise combination of  composition, lighting, and subject matter that makes for a perfect photograph is often ephemeral.

This is both the thrill and the challenge of taking candid images, of course. Getting it all right in just an instant is where the skill lies. A photographer whose aims are to capture meaningful candid images must practice almost daily to develop the reflexes and familiarity with his or her equipment in order to be there when things are happening, and be able to get the shot when they do.

For the same reason, it makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to ask for consent to take a photograph in the same moment that the image presents itself to your eye.

Tips for taking better street photos

Dumplings for lunch

You get the best results in street photography when you are discreet both in your manner and the gear you are using. Whether you are at home or travelling your street photography can benefit from taking an anthropological approach.  Having knowledge of an area (often gained by having walked around it extensively), understanding they kinds of people who frequent it, what they are doing there and how the lighting and ambience of the place will change over the course of a day and into night, all contribute towards your ability to capture stunning street portraits and capture powerful images that tell stories and convey a sense of place.

Embed yourself in an a “target rich” environment until you effectively meld into the background, then wait before taking any photographs. Anyone who’s ever enjoyed the practice of street photography will develop a sense of where good photos are likely to come from. Even though the moments that occur are randomly generated by the multifactorial interactions of strangers, time, the position of the sun in the sky and countless other factors, a photographer with a good eye will sense a place rich in potential and spend more time there.

There is no question, from an aesthetic point of view, that candid images are generally more appealing and more potent than posed images of the same subjects, or images in which the subjects know they are being observed.

For a good time...
For a good time…

The act of observing something inherently changes that which is being observed. This is one of the mind-bending results of a thought experiment known as  Schrödinger’s cat by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in trying to describe the way two different quantum states can co-exist, or be in “superposition” until observed in which instant the superposition collapses into one or another of possible definite states.

While I don’t suggest taking photographs of two strangers kissing on a park bench in Paris is the equivalent of conducting one’s own quantum physics experiment, it is true that the kiss would be changed or possibly not transpire at all if the photographer gently nudged into their embrace and asked if it would be okay to snap a shot of them.

Ultimately, as is the case I hope every time you press the button on a camera, use your judgement. Take only photos you would be proud to share and show the world, and that enhance or elevate your street photography subjects, or that expose a story or place that brings a higher level of awareness and sensitivity to a wider audience for a subject you actually care about and are trying to make a difference in. In the end, there are no strangers in photography. Under the gaze of your lens, everyone is a somebody if you accord each individual with the respect – and compassion – each and every one of us deserves.

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Here’s looking at you kid

Candid photography lies at the very heart of why people love photographs in the first place. By all means you should pursue it as an art, a hobby or a professional practice. I believe the best photos are the ones where the photographer has gained an implicit trust from his or her subjects. This is gained through the sheer force of personality, the proof of the work you have already undertaken, and the evidence you demonstrate of having integrity whenever and whereever you and your camera are.

Ideas for optimizing your event sponsorship investment

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How an event photographer can help optimize your event sponsorship investment.

I cover a lot of large conferences and trade shows that are largely funded by sponsors. Sponsors pay to have their company logo, brand message and business development professionals gain access to the targeted audience attending the event. Sponsorships take the form of brief presentations, banners, swag bag stuffing, mentions on the big screen in the pre-roll before the conference day kicks off, as well as areas like lounges, or massage stops, or juice bars. Sponsors pay for the wi-fi access, and brand the room keys at the hotel where the event is taking place. They cover virtually every meal, reception and sometimes outings for guests. It is not unusual for a sponsor to spend upwards of $50k on sponsorships for an event that may last at the most a few days.

A few busy days where attendees are bombarded with information, exposed to branding and logos from hundreds of companies, gather fistfuls of business cards and all while being slightly jet-lagged, hungover and still trying to keep up on their work email.

As an event sponsor, are you getting the most for your money?

As an event photographer I am used to covering sponsored events and of course take the time to gather a set of images that are for the sponsor. These include the room set up with and without people (if they have sponsored a reception, or a dinner), all branded elements (takeaways, gifts for attendees, bags, sponsored areas like lounges, or interactive stations), as well as the speakers and company representatives if the sponsorship includes a segment of air time at the event.

But I think a creative sponsor could get more leverage by actually sponsoring the event photographer directly. Event organizers could work with the photographer to identify areas where direct sponsorships make sense and either split the fee, or leverage the sponsor to cover the photographer’s fees, saving costs for the organizer.

There are obvious sponsorship opportunities like photo booths, but I would recommend thinking “out of the photobooth” box to the more wide-reaching impact an event photographer can have.

Consider: the event photographer is going to be seen by virtually every guest, and interact with almost every one of them at one point or another during a multi-day event. What other sponsorship opportunity can guarantee face time in front of every single guest?

But who pays attention to the photographer, you might say. He or she is just there to document the event and be as unobtrusive as possible.

If you believe that your event photographer should remain in the background, like a liveried wait staff in a posh restaurant, then yes, perhaps you are better off taking a more conventional approach to event sponsorship.

But if you understand that part of what a good event photographer does is engage and interact with people – as a function of doing the job of getting fun and interesting photos of your event – than you may also recognize that adding a layer of sponsorship to that activity can possibly further your sponsorship goals for the event. And it could be far less expensive than a big branding opportunity but reach as much, if not more, of the same target audience.

A few ideas come to mind that wouldn’t cost more than a thousand dollars (which is small change for event sponsorship budgets):

  • Why not consider asking your event photographer to wear a sponsored blazer or jacket?
  • Or design a sticker or logo to attach to the photographer’s flash body which is always visible?
  • Offer branded instant prints to your guests.
  • Plunk a portable instant printer down in the centre of the conference room tables, “Sponsored by YOUR BRAND” and let guests have fun snapping and printing their own photos with their phones

Branding at events is always a bit of a guessing game and it’s hard to know if the money is having the desired impact or if conference warriors suffer the same kind of banner blindness to event sponsors that most of us do when seeing an ad on our phones. Thinking creatively about new ways to leverage your event sponsorship budget is at least worth considering, given the amount of money at stake and the opportunity for increasing your impact.

Which instant print camera to buy?

I recently ran a team for a big event at Montreal’s New City Gas, hosted by the UAE. The event was extremely well-attended with over 1000 guests shuttled in and passing through the space over the course of a few hours.  One of the photographic services we provided, in addition to droneography, a greenscreen photobooth, a team of event photographers and videographers, was a dedicated instant prints photographer. I armed him with both a Polaroid Z2300W which prints on stickers and what the manufacturer calls ZINK Paper (zero ink) as the client had specifically asked we used Polaroids. As a back-up, I also bought the Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Neo (Classic).  It was an unintentional a/b test and rarely have the results been more divergent.

POLAROID.jpgTo put it mildly, the Polaroid was a complete dud. It’s proprietary battery couldn’t hold a charge long enough to complete one full set of prints (30). It is flimsy and cheaply made and looks like a toy camera. Sadly, even a toy camera would have brought more enjoyment than this and it is a far, far cry from what a Polaroid once was. Loading the paper is easy, but getting the starter sheet (a blue paper that must first eject before the camera can produce prints) required multiple attempts before it would work, wasting time and further depleting the already miserably weak battery. When finally you do manage to load ten sheets into the paper chamber be careful not to brush against the little latch in the back or the door will pop open and out will tumble your sheets. But even if it works, the prints (full frame and not the matted white traditional Polaroid look you would expect) are low quality, grainy and with colours so muted and garbled they come out looking like they were already old and abused, and not in a cool retro way, just in a “ew, yucky” way.

The camera is actually a hybrid digital camera, meaning it has the ability to shoot and save digital jpeg files to an SD card, like a regular digital point and shoot would, and print images you select to print. While on the surface that seems like a nice option to have, the competing demands on the miserly battery exceed any utility gained by the feature.

If one could apply a negative star rating to a product, this one merits a below zero score. Do not waste your money or time fiddling with this poorly conceived, poorly constructed and sorry excuse for a camera from what was once one of photography’s iconic brands.

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And the winner is…Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 Neo by a country mile

Happily, my “back-up” performed beautifully as I’ve grown to appreciate with the few, but growing stable of Fujifilm cameras I am acquiring. The prints are higher quality than the Polaroids (and actually look like Polaroids!), and the battery after one charge and 90 prints is still powering this handy little fun camera. Remarkably, it also sells for about $50CAD less than the Polaroid Z2300W and though its prints are pricier ($19.99 for 20 vs $19.99 for 30 ZINK Paper prints), they feel and look better and I suspect will last much longer too though we’ll have to wait and see for that.

If you’re looking at adding instant prints into your events, or even just to bring along with you on your next family vacation, if you can stomach the ongoing print costs pick up one of these Fujifilms. You won’t be disappointed.

(N.B. In case any of you were wondering if this is a paid post, it isn’t. Everything I write here is written by me, from my own unbiased and unsponsored point of view. I am not shilling for Fuji or going out of my way to trash Polaroid. I am sharing my opinion as a professional photographer about two products I’ve used and seen the results from.)

 

 

The last time you did anything

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Anytime you do something, it’s the last time you do it. Even if you are working on a manufacturing line, repeating the same process day in and day out, the sameness of your experience is an illusion you can recognize and discard so that you can grow past it.  Just as you can never step in the same river twice, you can never truly repeat anything. You are always on the first and last attempt.

This to me translates into making every moment count. Everything matters when you realize that you won’t have a second chance at it.

When I am taking photos at the events I cover, I am pressing my shutter button hundreds of times a night. In a given week I may shoot upwards of 3,000 images.  Do I really believe that every shot matters?

Yes, I do. Because that instant I am observing, when a face breaks into a smile, or a pair of eyes light up with intelligence and interest, matters to me and in another millisecond it will pass. The light in the room will change, sometimes within minutes. The “vibe” and feeling in the room will flow and alter course as the night progresses. Nothing remains constant. Each shot is another opportunity to capture something that won’t ever happen just the same way again.

You might think that this is exaggeration and hyperbole. Philosophically you may cede the point, but really, does it matter that much whether you get a shot of that woman smiling over at table 68, or that man in deep conversation standing by the projection screen? Maybe it doesn’t to you. But when I’m working, I think it does. And if you are that person on the other end of the shot, it may matter to you.

I’ve had the experience now of having taken the last photo of a few people who I later learned died not long afterwards. I can’t be certain mine was the very last photo taken, but I think it’s probable. Once it was a young caregiver at my daughter’s daycare, another time a much loved and respected philanthropist. When I look at these photos I think to myself what if I had just not bothered that one time. If I had turned my attention inward or off a little, been a little blasé about what I was doing. After all, I’m just an event photographer. I’m not saving lives in an emergency room or devoting myself to teaching literacy to poor underprivileged children in the developing world.

If I had done that of course, these photos wouldn’t exist. And I like to think that whatever comfort they may have provided to the loved ones they left behind, would have been a little less. Maybe that doesn’t matter to everyone, but it matters to me.

I also recognize, when reflecting on these rare occasions, that you never know when you are living your last day. It always amazes me that we live our lives and then one day they just stop. Lurking in every breath we take is the thought, perhaps the fear, that one day we will take our last. Will I be ready? Will I have done enough? Will I have mattered?

Thinking that way pushes me right back into the present moment. If this could be my last day, time with my child, meal, walk in a park…I want it to matter. I want it to count. I want to take it all in and absorb everything possible from the experience.

This also transforms the natural fear of death, into a powerful joyful fuel. You will end. So while you are here, make everything matter. This moment now won’t come back. So be in it. And the next one to. For as long as you have.

This kind of thinking infuses not just my work, but all of my life. How I spend my time with friends and family. The things I like to do. The way I recover when I mess up and break the trust with myself or another. When I am losing my temper over some kind of momentary situation, I always return to the awareness that the moment is passing and if this were to be my last, I would not want it to end this way.

It doesn’t matter what you do. Whether you drive a truck for a living or trade financial derivatives that no one understands but are making you filthy rich. The moments matter. Being conscious of them can enhance your time infinitely and bring richness to every encounter such that the everyday becomes almost miraculous in its power to give and teach you something new.

Don’t wait.

What is social mediagraphy?

julianhaber-snapchatPhotography + social media = social mediagraphy

I love making up neologism and one I’ve recently started using to describe my event photography service offering to clients is social mediagraphy. I used to be able to work exclusively as a photographer, documenting an event or covering a conference then delivering the set of edited images to my client for distribution through their communications channels like newsletters, websites and the like. This is no longer sufficient for today’s market which demands a steady and constant flow of snackable content, in real-time, to keep audiences engaged and re-engaged throughout the course of an event.

No large event today is deemed to have happened if it doesn’t have its own # and generate volumes of Tweetable, and re-tweetable content. And as a photographer, I’ve learned to adapt and actually enjoy the connectivity and heightened appreciation for my work that this behaviour brings.

Where I used to be an invisible service provider, working away in a kind of obscurity producing images that would be used long after my work was done, I am now often thrust in the middle of the action, generating and sending out my own socially-media-friendly Tweets, Instagram posts and LinkedIn content as it relates to what I’ve been covering as a photographer during an event. And clients appreciate it, because it helps them with their goals of generating interest and sparking conversations surrounding the content they’ve pulled together to mount their conference, or to satisfy the needs of their membership, boards or communications teams who work hard to show ROI on the big events they develop.

Social mediagraphy, as I would define it from the point of view of a photographer, is the combination of both traditional event coverage with frequent bursts of social media activity. In my case I will use my phone during events, and then later on post edited and refined images from the day’s coverage. Post-event, I’ll usually follow up with a roundup or a few blog posts relating back to the event, or a particular piece of content that resonated with me that I think bears reporting on for my audience.

If a quote happens at a conference and nobody Tweets it, does it matter at all?

Once the content is created and pushed out there, it can, and often is, picked up by event attendees who sometimes add their own commentary to the posts, or simply retweet or repost the content so that it reaches ever-widening circles of influence.

workingAll of this helps increase the impact from an event and enables event organizers to leverage their attendees to extend their reach into their networks, as the people at one event are usually connected to a bigger number of people outside of the event for whom the event also has appeal. Aside from seeding sales and requests for invitations for future events, this also helps validate the relevancy of the event to its target audiences and provides context for people on the outside who may be curious and become interested in learning more simply by coming across one or more of these social tidbits as they float through their ever-refreshed news feed. It’s also fun and a great way to make new friends.

Change is good

Change is at the heart of all technology. Photography is no longer sufficient on its own to meet the demands of clients who find themselves having to publish content in myriad forms to satisfy the needs of their audiences. Gone are the days when you could shoot an event, deliver your work weeks later and charge a premium for the service. Whether your event is a wedding, a corporate gala, AGM, trade show or a conference, photos are now but one layer of social proof needed to help augment and enhance the experience. Of course this requires new skill sets and familiarity with constantly changing tools (I’m still fairly lame at Snapchat but working on it) but that’s part of the fun of photography and working with technology in general. Rapid change is the constant of our times today and the only way to not drown in it is to embrace it.

Baby it’s cold outside – but  these warm-hearted Montrealers are heating things up

My view this afternoon from Cafe Shaika
My view this afternoon from Cafe Shaika

It’s cold in Montreal today. -10 Celsius and dropping. While it’s bright and sunny outside, it’s more fun to experience cold winter days like this through a window from a cosy café, which is my plan for this afternoon as I put together my roundup of events I covered so far this year. Luckily there are lots of people still braving the cold and getting out there for worthy events in these winter months, keeping me busy. Here are a few highlights worth sharing from goings on around town in Montreal this past January and February.

Here’s the link to the roundup in pictures. Please read on for details on the various events.

ProductTank MTL

ProductTank MTL

Montreal’s got a talented pool of tech entrepreneurs, developers and product managers who’ve now got another monthly  meetup/chance to drink and network with the monthly events hosted by ProductTank MTL. This month’s meet up which I covered at l’Appartement (one of Montreal’s hip resto/bars in Old Montreal), focused on the Internet of Things (IoT). According to Gartner Inc.: “ The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical objects that contain embedded technology to communicate and sense or interact with their internal states or the external environment.” 128 people had gathered to hear presentations by Jean-François Martin, Director of Products at mnubo; Yahya El Iraki, CEO at mySeat and Mathieu Lachaine, Founder and CEO at Ubios. All three speakers are involved with connected products and had interesting, behind-the-scenes insights and advice for people interested in the exploding Internet of Things (IoT) space. Gartner forecasts that “6.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2016, up 30 percent from 2015, and will reach 20.8 billion by 2020. Yes, that means that your fridge will be able to order beer for you when you are running out and your toaster will be able to keep track of how much multi-grain toast you’re making.

Interested in learning more and attending the next Meetup? Check out ProductTank MTL here: http://www.meetup.com/ProductTank-Montreal/

Pedal for Kids / Pédalez pour les enfants

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Anyone who knows me, knows I love children and that I support child-friendly causes. I’ve been lucky to work with the Montreal Children’s Hospital Foundation (MCHF) for the past two years which puts me right in the heart of a lot of events aimed at raising funds for much needed equipment and programs the Montreal Children’s Hospital uses to save and improve the lives of sick kids. I rarely cover one of these kinds of events without something making me tear up and hide behind my camera, and the kickoff cocktail for the 25th anniversary of Pedal for Kids was no exception.

The Pedal For Kids / Pédalez pour les enfants event is one of the most fun and exciting fundraisers organized by the MCHF. I had covered it earlier this summer but had not had the opportunity to hear Michael Conway, one of the events co-founders, speak until this month. Sylvie Lalumière and Michael Conway launched Pedal for Kids in 1992 in memory of their daughter, Meagan. By the time he was done I was ready to put on my spandex suit and bike until next summer. If you’re curious or would like to get involved with Pedal for Kids check them out here. You can join an existing team, create a new one or go solo. Sign up here: http://pedalez.com/about-the-event/

30th annual Vision Celebration Fundraiser Gala for the Black Theatre Workshop #OscarsSoWhite

Black Theatre Workshop

Earlier this year I covered the Black Theatre Workshop’s 30th Annual Vision Fundraiser Gala and also marks the launch of Black History Month in Canada. This is my third year covering this party and I am always blown away by the talent in the room, both onstage and off.  The evening was superbly hosted by Nantali Indongo (of Nomadic Massive fame) with performances by Montreal’s Jireh Gospel Choir,  Kim Richardson and Daniel Loyer, and the coolest (and only) reggae version of Adele’s Hello that I’ve ever heard as part of DJ Don Smooth’s soundtrack for the night.

The guest of honour was Jackie Richardson, aka, Canada’s First Lady of gospel, jazz and blues who received the Martin Luther King Jr. Achievement Award. Also on the roster were: Otis Grant, world championship boxer who received the Dr. Clarence Bayne Community Service Award; Briauna James who received the Victor Phillips Award, and Vladimir Alexis who received the Gloria Mitchell-Aleong Award. Artistic Director, Quincy Armorer couldn’t be physically present as he was performing in Twelfth Night in Ottawa’s National Arts Centre, but he made an appearance via Facetime.

Here’s a sample of the Jireh Gospel Choir in action (rather poorly filmed on my iPhone)

University Club Arts Event

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Though sadly I missed the Beaver Hall Group show at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, I was lucky to catch a sneak peek at the curation of the event at a arts event held at the University Club of Montreal. I love the old world charm of the club, and events like these are a reminder of Montreal’s historic and ongoing role as a city of the arts.

Is there really a difference between event photographers?

Mike Harris
Mike Harris

I was shooting an event in Toronto last week of an award dinner / fundraiser at a ritzy hotel with several very high-profile attendees. It was a fairly typical event, the kind I’ve covered hundreds of times before, with a pre-dinner cocktail hour in the lobby area of the reception hall where guest agglomerated over drinks and canapés, chit chatting and catching up with each other as they waited for the main doors to open up. The lighting was subdued, the bars mirrored. The men wore suits and ties, the women elegant evening gowns. 450 guests were there, each having paid a handsome price for the ticket with over 20 fully sponsored tables of ten. It was an important event for the organizer, with an important group of patrons and having covered events for this client in the past in Montreal, I was happy to have been invited to cover this one in Toronto as well. Clearly they liked my work I thought, and realized that having an experienced hand at working these kind of high-society events yields the right kind of images for their purposes.

FI-JACK_COCKWELL 17That’s why I was quite taken aback when I was chatting with one of the client team members (albeit not the one who hired me) when she asked, quite genuinely, “Is there really that much of a difference between event photographers?”. We were standing in the main hall looking out through the doors at the thickening crowd of mostly dark suited men gnoshing on smoked salmon and quaffing glasses of white wine when she asked. “Well, yes, I think so.” I responded, trying not to sound defensive or overly surprised at the query.

And the truth is, I shouldn’t be because though I don’t often hear it, I do experience the effects of that sort of thinking often. When you work, as I do, in a highly competitive field where the barrier to entry is low, and the perceived value of your service, under appreciated, this attitude translates into many behaviours clients and prospective clients exhibit such as:

  • Brief (one or two liner) email queries asking for a price based on loosely defined schedules for upcoming events, usually in the very near or immediate future
  • Requests for detailed quotes based on unspecific requirements
  • Refusals to acknowledge or present a realistic budget
  • Assumptions that your price is always negotiable
  • Discussions focused on price rather than value
  • Focus on detailed shot requirements rather than discussion on what the purpose and end use of the images will be
  • Assumptions that all photographers also provide video coverage at the same time for the same price

Part of this is due to the ubiquity of photography today and the near infinite demand for constant content feeds through a warren of social media networks. This ubiquity is both a blessing and a curse, as it proves that there is a near constant need for photography, but there is also a decreasing respect afforded to professional practitioners and a widespread belief, exemplified by the leading question of this post, that the service is a commodity, photographers by and large undifferentiated from one another and consequently, price takers in the economic relationship between client and provider.

But then, what is the mark of a good professional photographer worth the fee being asked and one who will work for any budget (or none) and claim to offer the same service?

The answer I think comes down to a blend of factors that some clients get instantly, and others will never really get.

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A good photographer covering an event will do so in a manner that does not cause guests to feel uncomfortable or hold awkward smiles or poses for long. The images will be well-lit, attention given to background, colours and flattering angles for all manner of the shapes and sizes that humans come in. He or she will take the time to understand the event, the importance of key attendees, and if working with a brand, the brand values and personality, to ensure not only their images, but also their behaviour is consonant with the client’s. The photos delivered will also be well-organized, easily accessible, rapidly turned around, and the transactional details of the contract conducted professionally and with respect to the client’s needs and internal processes. And the photographer will still be there after the event is over and the bill paid, to respond to any additional needs that may come up and of course, to serve again on future events having now established him or herself as a known quantity which eliminates at least one element of potential concern in the many moving parts that comprise event coordination, planning and execution.

FI-JACK_COCKWELL 394Hiring experienced professionals may appear to cost more than hiring newbies, but is the same value being provided by both? If you think that indeed, there really is no difference, than the cheapest option makes the most sense. More experienced providers who are able to offer premium level service cost more. Many clients may be satisfied with less, and that’s perfectly okay.

Some, however, realize that talent is worth paying for.

You are somebody – so smile

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I am somebody

I chose the handle @ursomebody for my Instagram account after realizing that julianhaberphotography was too long. But that’s not the only reason – I also chose it because I believe that everyone is a somebody but not everyone believes that about themselves and I find that kind of sad.

I realized that the core of what I do – photograph people at work and at play – provides me with a unique position from which to observe humans in their sometimes unnatural habitats of gala parties and conferences, work parties, and social gatherings. From years of peering through my lenses at thousands of faces, I’ve honed my intuition and feel sometimes like I can see right into who someone is, just by the way they look when they don’t think anyone else is watching, or how they present themselves when they do. I feel this is one of the privileges of being a photographer and I am very grateful for the experience.

What I have observed countless times is the amount of discomfort and social anxiety many people feel that they do their best to hide. Reflecting on that, I came to the conclusion that main reason people feel awkward in social situations is because they harbour a sense of insecurity about themselves. They feel judged. They don’t think they are pretty. They think their clothes don’t fit them well. They think they are fat. They think they are too short. Too tall. Too skinny. Too ugly.

So they develop ways of hiding. They lean away from the photographer. They smirk rather than smile. They slouch, they turn their bodies defensively away from the lens. These gestures and subtle adjustments to posture and pose when facing a lens are not always conscious or deliberate. I believe, in fact, that most are unconscious. But to me it says that the person before me feels a kind of pain and I’ve learned that a big part of my job as a photographer of people at social and professional events is to make that pain disappear – however briefly. One easy way to do it is just by being kind and by recognizing that not everyone who is beautiful believes it about themselves, so I try to make them feel that they are. I think this is a valuable thing to learn to do for oneself as well.

We are somebodies
We are somebodies

A few helpful things you can do if you are one of those people who doesn’t like the way they look or feels uncomfortable in front of a camera – and there are many others who feel just like you do – is to smile. Just the act of smiling opens up positive energy inside of you and actually improves your state of mind. And you instantly look much better, I can guarantee you that.

We are somebodies
We are somebodies too

Deeper down, my wish is also for you to stop being so hard on yourself. I was once chastised (in a friendly way) by someone whose portrait I had taken for having slightly blended out a few small wrinkles in her face. I hadn’t really thought much about it as I try not to edit portraits very heavily and only allow myself slight interventions to enhance the natural beauty of the person I am photographing. But in this case, the woman – a mother of four – told me she was proud of her wrinkles and didn’t want them brushed away and I realized that she was absolutely right.

You’ve earned the face you have now. Be proud of who you are, how you look and what you can still give to the world.

You are somebody.

 

Winning at fundraising for Room to Read

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John Wood, Room to Read cofounder, speaking at Montreal’s Destination Global Literacy event on May 7, 2015

I’ve been an event photographer for over a decade and have covered countless fundraisers, but I am especially proud of my involvement with the Destination Global Literacy event the Room to Read Montreal Chapter held on May 7th, 2015 in Montreal. As a member of the Advisory Board for the Montreal Chapter, and a father of a young daughter, I couldn’t be more supportive of what Room to Read is trying to achieve: literacy for all, gender equality, and sustainable educational centres in parts of the world where opportunities are few – and even fewer for the poor and illiterate.  

Last night we were treated by Room to Read’s founder, John Wood, who cheered on the roomful of donors (and Habs fans=) and helped push our fundraising efforts over the top.  By the end of the night we had raised over $200,000. RTRMTL 173

One particularly generous family who chose to remain anonymous offered up a dollar for dollar match up to $75,000. Considering the cost of putting ten girls through secondary school for a year in Room to Read’s Girls’ Education Program is $3000, or the price of a book printed in their local language is $1, that’s a lot of life changing money being spent directly where it will impact the lives of the students themselves and the communities they will grow into and improve.

Below are a few sample photos from the event with more over here on my portfolio site: Room to Read Montreal Chapter Event, May 7, 2015 hosted by BMO

Essential shotlist for conference & tradeshow photography

One of the most important things to keep in mind when hiring a shooter to provide conference or trade show photography is to think about the value the photos create and how you will get the best use out of the images.

There are multiple audiences for good conference and trade show coverage. Here are a few that come to mind:

  • Past and present attendees
  • Prospective and future attendees
  • Speakers & presenters
  • Corporate communications teams
  • Marketing and sales teams
  • Event planners and event management companies
  • Experiential marketers
  • Venue owners

What is the value of these types of images?
Depending on who the end client/user/viewer of the images is intended for, the value can be:

  • Showcase a successful event – large filled rooms, happy smiling people looking engaged, looking like they are having a good time, connecting with each other, doing business
  • Highlight successful positioning of branded signage and collateral
  • Highlight the breadth and scope of an event to attract future attendees
  • Show off quality of speakers and content
  • Boost employee morale and drive engagement
  • Sell tickets / drive attendance rates for future events
  • Builds content for your social media channels and web properties

So which types of shots are the most useful and critical to get right?

le Windsor room set up
le Windsor room set up

1. Set-up and room décor
Ideally rooms should be shot from multiple angles, but preferably with a wide enough lens to capture the breadth and feel of the space. The best time to capture the room set up is just before it will be opened up to the public, when the lighting is set up and the room is like a present waiting to be opened up.

2. People networking
This is an easy one to get done but requires attention and fast reflexes. You must anticipate handshakes, smiles and friendly greetings and capture the exchanges without interfering. Every conference has built in networking sessions even if they don’t call them that. More festive social events will also leverage the socially enlivening effects of alcohol. Depending on the industry, the drinks and bars themselves will have branded sponsors. Embedding into this environment requires a special blend of sociability and detachment so you know when to step back and capture images of people as they begin to loosen up.

We mix business with pleasure
We mix business with pleasure
Size matters
Size matters

3. Speakers on stage – front and side views
Getting good images of people on stage is trickier than it looks as the stage lighting can often cast unwanted colours or distortions on your subject. As well, not all speakers are to the podium born and some spend more than ninety percent of the time looking down at their notes. The best shots will come from both telephoto and shorter lenses, shot from the front of house and close to the sides. I usually aim to capture a few images of speakers with fun or illustrative slides behind them if they are in the midst of a slide show, but also make sure to get a few clean and clear ones just them, eyes open, faces smiling and mouths preferably not mid-word. It can be a bit of trial and error but the end goal is really just to get a handful of great shots of each speaker.

4. Views of room from speakers p.o.v
This is really a hybrid categories as it touches on both speakers and rooms, but it is worth having a few of these shots usually angled from the side or sometimes above the speaker, showing both the speaker on stage and the audience to whom he or she is speaking. This is a fun photo for the speaker themselves to have later one and helps promote a sense of attending an interesting, worthwhile event.

Life's a stage
Life’s a stage

5. Big and wide shots of filled rooms
All event planners, conference organizers and companies hosting events want to see their event as a success – and nothing says success better than showing a room full of people. There will be different kinds of such rooms: some will be general sessions with people sitting in their seats, others will show the room in states of transition before or after an event. Sometimes the big room is where an opening night reception is being held. Other times it’s just a general overview shot to show the look and feel of the full space. These images should be taken with big, wide angles, but can also be augmented with candid portraits drawn from the crowd shot on telephoto lenses so the subjects are truly at ease and may not even realize they are in the photos.

I'm paying close attention
I’m paying close attention

6. Engaged audiences in sessions
Diving a little deeper into the idea of showing full rooms, these shots pertain primarily to smaller breakout sessions common at many conferences. Here the rooms are smaller, the speakers usually just standing at a the front of the room, sometimes with but often without podiums, and the aim, as always is to capture images of people paying attention, eyes forward, smiling and asking questions. Depending on the nature of the conference and industry, it may be helpful to have a few shots of people taking notes or texting on their phones, but the majority of images should show people doing what they are supposed to be doing in the room – learning something.

7. People smiling, having fun and making connections
The social side of business confabs is in some industries the most important part of the event. In businesses where making connections and doing deals is important (and when isn’t it) conferences can provide ideal locations for meeting a large number of high quality prospects/partners/future employers. This is the value to the people attending. The value to the people organizing these events is showing that their event is where business gets done and connections are formed. I love these kinds of events and have a lot of fun weaving in and out of the crowd soliciting, eliciting and noticing great photo ops. Selfies, photobombs, generic groupings of twosomes and foursomes (or more) will all happen in here so working with a short and flexible lens is key, but I also carry around a long lens to take sniper type shots of people across the room, trying to avoid detection so that I can capture real emotional exchanges and genuine reactions.

Deal!
Deal!
Seeing the forest for the trees
Seeing the forest for the trees

8. Interesting details, close ups of on-site marketing collateral, giveaways, promos
Finally, throughout the conference you’ll want to make sure you have images showing any promotional item provided by a sponsor, as well as just a set of fun, creative, interesting, artistic even, shots of details that emerge as salient to the event. Judgement and skill is required here but over time it becomes clear what these elements are. No-brainers include shots of program covers, branded spaces, signage, banners and products (in the case of trade shows).

9. People interacting with displays/products
This one pertains mainly to trade shows but can be relevant to conferences that host vendors in common areas as well. The main goal here is to showcase the brand, the product or service on offer, and lots of images of people engaging with the display or items. Interaction, engagement and as always, smiling faces are key here. Closeups on pertinent details and any interesting visual elements available should also be captured.

The laser pointers were a hit
The laser pointers were a hit

Adventures with flying drones

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Drone selfies!

Lately I’ve been feeling that my event photography could use a bit of a lift….so I invested in a drone. After covering hundreds of events I’ve learned that one of the most exciting angles is a shot from above showing the full contingent of guests, or the beautiful setting a wedding is taking place in, for example. I’ve climbed up trees, clambered up rickety fire escapes and balanced on roof tops to get shots from above, but now I think I’ve found a (somewhat) safer solution: a flying drone equipped with a high res camera that shoots high definition video and stills.

While I’m still mastering flying techniques, I’m extremely excited about the potential. It’s new, a lot of fun, and I’m betting there are many people who will find having their portrait taken from above to be as exciting as it sounds. I plan on offering drone services for weddings (imagine your full wedding party outdoors, smiling up at the sky as the drone hovers over you!), as well as for real estate developments, and other large-scale events.

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It’s a bird, it’s a plane…it’s a drone!

Flying the drone is not without its challenges and weather conditions need to be virtually perfect (windless, clear skies with no trees or wires hanging nearby), but I’ve no doubt that adding a drone into the mix will bring a little something extra to any event.

 

Is an event photographer worth the expense?

iMedia1
Award Winners at recent iMedia Summit, Austin, Texas

Why pay for an event photographer these days?

Asking yourself why you should hire and pay for a professional photographer  is a valid question. In an era of ubiquitous cameras and permanently constrained budgets, is a professional photographer really necessary? As a working professional photographer, understanding why my clients hire me (over any number of alternatives) is core to understanding the value I bring to clients. Here’s some of what I have learned over the past fifteen years working as a professional event photographer on Montreal, Ottawa and abroad.

Before we get to the why, let’s tackle the reasons why not to hire to professional event photographer:

  • If you are on a very tight budget and view the expense of a few hundred dollars with great trepidation, than you should save the money and look for alternatives to a professional. Depending on what you were thinking of hiring your photographer for, you can ask around among your guests and invites if there are any budding amateur photographers who might be interested in doing your event photography for you. Many people enjoy taking pictures and for every professional photographer there are probably ten good amateurs who can take good photographs but who don’t need/want/dare try to do it professionally. Trade them a chance for photos and you both might end up winners.
  • If you “just want a couple of shots” and think “it won’t take more than an hour” than ask one of your volunteer or junior staffers to use a pocket camera and take the handful of shots you might want. While the lighting won’t be perfect, you can probably get something usable.
  • If you don’t need to do something with the photos from an event and aren’t planning on making the images available to the guests, then don’t bother. Use your phone to snap a few shots for posterity. There is no point in paying professional fees if the resulting images are not intended for some kind of professional use (marketing, fundraising, giving as gifts to VIP guests, etc).

Now let’s look at a few good reasons why you should hire a professional event photographer:

  • If you intend to use the photos generated from the event for any marketing purpose whatsoever you want to hire a pro. A professional photographer is trained to think of a lot of important details at once when appearing to simply be snapping away. A pro places people against good backgrounds, watches for unwanted shadows, provides a mix of natural and flash lit images for variety, arrives before the guests to get set-up shots and room views, pays attention to the important parts of any event and is ready to get the shot without being in the way.
  • If you are giving photos to media you need a professional shooter. Media-ready photos need to be treated with a little extra attention. Most media need a high res version of an image as quickly as possible after an event (in many cases immediately if you are to get any real timely value from the images). The images given also need to be appropriate and match the intended message and purpose for sending them to media in the first place. Sending the wrong kind of image to media can have unintended negative consequences and looks amateurish. Media people are always busy and they perform a highly valuable service for promoters who can, if properly done, get lots of free earned media coverage out of an event that will far exceed in savings the cost of hiring a professional to capture and deliver those images.
  • If you are running a very complicated schedule or have a lot of important guests in attendance, you cannot afford to have a non-professional shooter on site. A pro knows how to handle people, how to set up key group shots, how to get all the right photos and how to do it while seamlessly blending in with the crowd. And they can usually get the shot they need in one take. Important people tend to be impatient and dislike having their photo taken, particularly if they are asked to stand and pose again and again as your non-professional fumbles with his or her gear. Ask yourself how much it is worth to have one of your VIPs have a good opinion of your event or conversely, how much it might cost your professional reputation if your photographer blows it?  datawars

There are other pros and cons for hiring a professional event photographer, and if you are someone who does hire professionals, I’d love to read your comments to this article and see what you have to add, but the short answer to the question is simply this: If you are in the business of events (or are running an event important to your business in some way) and have a professional use for the images from your event then hire a pro. You wouldn’t hire your sister to cater your event (even is she does make a mean casserole) so why hire your cousin to take the photos that your business relies on?

Creative conference coverage

Chris Malone, Author of "The Human Brand", speaking at the iMedia Canada Summit, April 6-8, 2014, Montreal
Chris Malone, Author of “The Human Brand”, speaking at the iMedia Canada Summit, April 6-8, 2014, Montreal

Covering a conference or trade show is not as easy it would seem. While it may look like all you have to do is wander around, point your camera and shoot, the process of getting really good conference photos is a little more complex than that. As a photographer, it is critical that your images capture both the feel of the event but also convey the organizer’s messages and help them to achieve their marketing goals.  When covering a conference, then, not only do you need to contend with variable lighting, from hot stage lights to fluorescent breakout session rooms, but importantly your professional mandate as discussed with your client.

Typically, a conference organizer wants to show their event off in its best light possible. While this is almost a truism in event photography, the conference (or trade show) is a little different than your regular corporate gala or fundraiser event, as the images generated from this year’s show are going to be used to help sell attendance in next year’s. So it is important to show future attendees the benefits they will get from attending in addition to all the well-curated content and knowledge they will gain. Photos should show people smiling, of course, as much as possible, but also doing the things they will be expecting to do, like shaking hands, exchanging business cards, listening to engaging speakers etc.

 (Julian Haber | 514.757.7657 | events@julianhaber.com, Julian Haber | 514.757.7657 | events@julianhaber.com)With corporate travel budgets constantly under pressure, the investment in sending one or a handful of employees to a conference must be clear. The images captured should also show the full range of activities at the event. All conferences follow a fairly predictable formula: large general sessions with keynote speakers, a few panel discussions, smaller breakout sessions and a lots of networking and socializing time in between the set menu to allow the attendees to make or renew contacts and actually enjoy themselves. Photos, shot from a few different angles of all these experiences are absolutely critical and will be key to delivering a set of images that will make your client happy.

Other shots required for a conference photographer should also include:

  • Good headshots of all the speakers: I often try to get a few before the speaker actually goes on stage by hanging around when they are setting up. This helps ensure you have at least one good image where the speaker is smiling and looking right at your lens as once they get going, you may have to snap many shots to make sure you have enough of the speaker talking with eyes open and mouth not that the conference organizers will be able to use in their promotional materials.
  • Posed groupings of attendees smiling and looking at the camera: these shots can be a little challenging if you are a shy or fly-on-the wall type photographer. As the professional, your work here is to interact and engage with the guests in a way that makes them feel good and willing to work with you to get a good photo, but to be quick and efficient at the same time. Ultimately, no one is at the conference for the photographs – they are there to learn, make contacts and hopefully do some business. As professionals they also want to look good in any images you make of them so you have a responsibility as the official event photographer to ensure that they do, without wasting their time when shooting,
  • A limited number of scenic shots shot from interesting angles: It is important to showcase the venue, usually a hotel, and give a sense of the rooms and ambience of the space selected by the organizers for the event. You don’t need a tonne of these kinds of shots, but a handful of representative images will help complete your set of deliverables to your client. These shots can usually be taken in between other events on any downtime you have during the conference.
  • Full rooms, engaged audiences: when covering any general sessions or breakout rooms, only shoot seats with smiling, engaged looking people in them. No one, not your client and not future attendees, wants to look at a conference with a bunch of empty seats. Abundance sells, so make sure your room shots look full and people look interested. Quality over quantity counts here as a few winning shots are all it will take to make the event look like a success – and bring smiles to your clients and hopefully repeat business when the conference becomes an annual event!

A final word on working as a conference photographer: Timeliness matters. Many organizers post the images from their conferences on a daily basis. This is great because once the first batch of images is up, attendees start to perk up and really make an effort with you to look good for the shot, knowing they too might end up featured on the conference organizer’s website. Take advantage of this almost real time streaming to be diligent in your shooting. Edit out dud images before the upload to save time and be ready for an end of day upload to make sure the client has good images to work with for the next day.

You can check out some of the shots I took recently for the Imedia Canada Summit, here.

iMedia Canada, Day 1

iMedia Canada, Day 2

iMedia Canada, Day 3

In the ring with George St. Pierre

gps2 (2)It’s not every morning I wake up at 5:30 and wind up in a ring with George St. Pierre, former Welterweight Champion of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. And I’ll be honest, I’m glad I was taking the shots and not getting them. The event, sponsored by Bacardi and held at the Tristar Gym in Montreal was billed as the Champ vs the Chump and featured a team of winners who, after one shot too many perhaps, submitted their names to a contest to be invited in to Montreal for a training session with the champ.

GSP was pure charm and charisma, taking time to make sure everyone in the ring with him learned and practiced the few moves he taught. As he said, quoting Bruce Lee, “The man who knows one move but has practiced it 1000 times is far more dangerous than the man who knows a 1000 move but only practiced each once.”gps2

That made me feel great because working an event like this one, I must’ve snapped 1000 shots, making me the ninja of photography.

 

 

What’s the difference between a photographer and a plumber?

In life, timing is everything.

50% off if you're a plumber
50% off if you’re a plumber

Now I am not drawing a facetious comparison between plumbers and photographers, as both provide valuable services and at precise moments in time, invaluable services; think: basement flooding from backed up sewer or capturing “The Kiss” on the wedding day. Both work with their hands and have a variety of tools (though a photographer’s kit is a little pricier than the average plumber’s bucket full of pipes and parts).

And both typically charge by the hour. And there’s a big difference here. If it’s 11pm, minus 30 outside and your water heater konks out or you’ve burst a pipe, you rapidly learn that you will pay anything to have your problem fixed. In economics this is known as price elasticity, or the price elasticity of demand. Some prices have high elasticity (the price of say, a pvc pipe; you’ll buy the cheapest one that does the job), while others are very inelastic, like the price of gas for your car (which you will pretty much pay no matter what it is as you have no choice). Usually, the fewer choices you have, the higher the price you will pay.

Many business exploit this to their huge advantage and even create scarcity, or the illusion thereof, like diamond companies do by buying up huge stocks of the world’s diamonds in order to keep the price elevated and the illusion of its scarcity strong.

Time also creates scarcity, as anyone dealing with a last-minute cancellation from a service provider before a big event will know. And here’s the main difference between a plumber and a photographer. Or at least between most plumbers and this photographer.

If you call a plumber with a last-minute emergency, the clock starts ticking the moment that plumber puts on his occasionally poorly fitting pants and drives to your home or business. You’ll pay the travel time, you’ll pay the service time, you’ll pay the parts and you’ll pay a premium for the rush job. God help you if it is also a holiday, evening or weekend – which is, of course, when everything that’s going to break does break.

3P5A9094---Version-2If you call me, and I’m not already booked, I’ll come work for you. I’ll do it for the same rate I would have charged you if you’d booked in advance. I’ll do it gladly and I’ll work to deliver quality images to you that not only meet your current need, but win your attention so that the next time you don’t end up booking another photographer who bails on you last-minute and leaves you scrambling.

I’m not one to brag, but it is very gratifying to know you’ve helped out a client and been there when they needed you to be there. Here’s what a recent client had to say after booking me last-minute:

Thanks so much for your help on Wednesday night. Everyone was very pleased with the event, and the photographs look great. If we’re ever in need of a photographer in Montreal again you’re the first person we’ll call.

You may be planning an event now, or will have to in the future. There are many details to organize and several moving parts to coordinate and things sometimes just go wrong. If you do find yourself at a loss and looking around in the last-minute for a photographer, rest assured that if you call me, you’ll be in good hands.

 

 

High Tea at the Ritz Carlton

The Mad Hatter
The Mad Hatter

Last weekend I took a trip through the looking glass of my camera to cover the Alice in Wonderland themed High Tea event held at the Ritz Carlton in Montreal as a fundraiser for the Miriam Foundation and Unicorn Children. I opted to go in costume as the Mad Hatter. Not sure everyone there understood my get up, but it certainly helped elicit smiles from the many guests as they sipped coconut flavoured DAVID’s teas and noshed on smoked salmon canapés.

Go Go Governor General!

It’s been a busy spring and I was pleased to be asked to cover the announcement of this year’s recipients for the Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards. An elegant reception was hosted in the sumptuous estate of the Beaubien de Gaspé family followed by a technologically enhanced press conference the next morning at a new, well equipped event space, the PHI Centre, in Old Montreal. Check out the pics here:

These photos are contagious – How to make your next product launch go viral

When a company wants to get the word out about a new product it is launching it often organizes an event. Influencers are invited (bloggers, specialists in the field, client evangelists), wined and dined and given opportunities to sample, try, and hopefully be wowed by the new product. An event photographer is often included in the marketing budget for the event, to help capture images of client interactions with the product and create a sense of excitement around the product launch, and therefore, the new product.

A bottleneck exists however, between the intended purpose of the photos produced and the way event photos are typically processed. The normal method is for the event photographer to deliver a set of images (usually via a passkey protected website) directly to the client, who then takes a few days to review them and sends them off. If they are really on the ball they will solicit a small set of key, high res images to have on hand immediately to send to media or through other channels (perhaps their brand’s Facebook page or Twitter feed). While this is a step in the right direction, there is a better way to really leverage your investment in event photos: incorporate a photobooth experience and make it easy for your guests to access and share their own photos.

A photobooth experience is an innovation on the standard meet-and-greet photo whereby guests enter a space, pose in front of a branded backdrop, and move on.  While this method is good for capturing countless very similar images of separate individuals and couples, it doesn’t actually create a lot of value for the organizer. The event photographer may spend an hour or more setting up the lighting and (depending on the size of the invitation list) shooting the arrivals, usually at additional cost to the event organizer. Is  the yield worth it? The end client (the event planner, PR firm or coordinator) will receive a large volume of nearly identical shots that they can only use a few of, guests will have a rather boring experience posing for a photographer, and the images will at best feature on the company/brand webpage somewhere where they are unlikely to be copied or shared by the subjects at a very high share rate. 

A better approach, and one with proven social virality, is to incorporate an element of whimsy and fun into these posed shots in front of a creative backdrop. At lePartybooth, for example (a sister company of Julian Haber Photography) a vast range of props are provided along with a huge selection of varied and playful backdrops. These props and accessories become playthings for the invitees who invariably love the experience of playing dress up. No matter what your product, a photobooth experience can greatly enhance your guests’ enjoyment of the launch, and, because every photo produced is unique and engages the creativity and playfulness of the subject, it is highly likely to be shared and re-shared by the person in the photo themselves. In effect, every image is contagious and will be taken from a main site and reposted to a subject’s own Facebook page or other social media channel. Instant virality.

Of course it is important to tie in the photobooth experience to the product and brand being launched, so some consideration can be given to the kinds of props and backdrop provided. For example, if you are launching a new phone handset, throw in a few giant oversized versions of your phone that guests can pose with. Or if your product is a new vehicle, provide a few stylized plush toy versions that guests can use in their photos. Getting creative with the props showcases not only your brand or product, but shows that you “get” that people no matter who they are, don’t want to be mere platforms for your company advertising. Treating people with respect and giving them something interesting and fun to do at your product launch translates into higher ROI on your event dollars. It means there is a far greater likelihood your guests will leave your event feeling happy and they are much more likely to want to share their photos online within their networks – which ultimately extends your reach far beyond the original invitation list.

It is imperative to leverage all event spending and get the best bang for your buck. Incorporate a photobooth experience into your next product launch, restaurant or store opening, fundraiser or other event aimed at gaining widespread public reach and you will reap benefits many times over your budgeted marketing spend.

The next big thing in event photography – retirement parties

There is never a dull moment in the life of an event photographer. One day you may be covering a trade show documenting the inner workings of 3D printers, the next you may find yourself aboard the Bateau Mouche in Montreal’s Old Port, taking a 3-hr tour covering a retirement party as I did earlier this year. The tricky part about covering an event on a boat, particularly one at night where all the guests are gathered in a single room (albeit one with a magnificent 360 degree view of the night sky and passing shoreline and cityscape), is finding interesting photos to take. I walked up and down the ship’s length and tried to capture images both of the changing sky and lighting effects from the boat’s decor by alternating between using on camera flash and natural light (the never-ending back and forth all event photographers deal with).

As usual, being the proverbial fly on the wall, I also had a chance to listen in on speeches given for a man who clearly had made many friends throughout his career. I always find my life quite extraordinary when covering events because I am embedded in the intimate lives of strangers, however briefly, and my job is to photograph how they are feeling when they are feeling the most. It is but one of the many reasons why I love what I do, and given the demographics of Quebec, I anticipate I will be providing event photography services for many more retirement parties to come. I just hope the next one has more than one room to work in.