View of Concordia Universitys new Applied Science Hub building featuring a 20 foot aluminum public art sculpture by Quebec artist Marc Antoine Côté

Breaking new ground

Photographing architecturally interesting buildings is one of the ways we’re pivoting as we ride out wave two of this pandemic here in Montreal.

The featured image in this post is a view of the south side of Concordia University’s new Applied Science Hub, showcasing a beautiful new piece of public art by Quebec artist Marc-Antoine Côtê entitled “Montre-moi par où on commence. Dis-le-moi au creux de l’oreille,” which translates to “Tell me where we start. Whisper it right into my ear.” The 2,700 kilograms of mainly aluminum are layered up 20 feet high, and the sculpture is designed to create opportunities for passers by to interact directly with it, offering an open access into its hollow interior for unique Instagrammable shots to the adventurous.

Looking up through the centre of sculpture by Marc Antoine Côté

View more sample images here: https://julianhaber.photoshelter.com/gallery/REAL-ESTATE/G0000Pr0pSuLpJjY

We also had a chance to shoot a newly constructed state-of-the-art aquatic centre in Granby, Quebec (the pool is heated using geothermal technology) which will soon be open to locals. The centre features two large indoor pools as well as one outdoor pool, a steam room accessible via both interior pools, as well as a climbing wall. 

Granby Aquatic Centre
Climbing wall poo

The centre is surround by seating areas and green space, and is across the street from the local hockey arena. 

Side view of Granbys aquatic centre

While the pandemic is slowing down economic activity across many sectors, new buildings are still being constructed representing an optimistic view of the future. There will come a time when (we hope) when this space is full of families lounging in the sun, sharing meals and resting after swimming. For now, we’re happy to have the chance to photograph these newly constructed buildings and facitilies.